Hop Dang Diggity
Lee St. John, a member of the National Society of Newspaper Columnists, is a No.1 Amazon ranked humorous author. Look for her on Facebook, Twitter (@LeeStJohnauthor), and her blog at www.leestjohnauthor.com. Her new release, “SHE’S A KEEPER! Cockamamie Memoirs from a Hot Southern Mess” can be found on Amazon.com.

Hop Dang Diggity

Lee St. John, a member of the National Society of Newspaper Columnists, is a No.1 Amazon ranked humorous author. Look for her on Facebook, Twitter (@LeeStJohnauthor), and her blog at www.leestjohnauthor.com. Her new release, “SHE’S A KEEPER! Cockamamie Memoirs from a Hot Southern Mess” can be found on Amazon.com.

I found a new beer. It’s an India Pale Ale but birthed in the South. Jekyll Island to be exact. According to the brewery’s press, this Southern IPA “is brewed to remind us of the aroma of those tall Georgia pines, while the malty backbone balances everything out. Hopped up like a one-legged chicken, this ain’t your standard IPA, Darlin.”

Did I mention it was created in Georgia? That in itself is reason to give it a go.

And I love the name. It reminds me of Grandpa from “The Real McCoys” a 1950s/1960s television show. When grandpa Amos became so exasperated with his grandson, he’s say, “Dag Nab It, Luke!” Dag. Dang. Whatever.

What are some of the words and phrases we used to say to remind us of another time? My husband makes fun of me, dag nab it; I even make fun of me, too, when I catch myself wanting to watch a certain television show that I am not going to be able to see at the moment and ask him to please, “tape it for me.” Another archaic television slang is, “Don’t touch that dial” because we might miss the TV show where we learned to express how well things are going by saying we are, “…living the ‘Life of Riley’” a show from 1953 – 1958. And speaking of television, I don’t remember reading this but do remember hearing the commercial for Carter’s Liver Pills. In 1868, Samuel J. Carter, of Erie, Pennsylvania, began peddling a pill he said could cure any type of stomach sickness. Within a generation, these “Carter’s Little Liver Pills” could also cure headaches, constipation, and indigestion, according to Mr. Carter. So many pills! When one heard the phrase, something like, “You have more excuses than Carter has pills,” you’d get it. But that phrase seems long gone, too.

Other media and technological expressions that hung around for a while but seem extinct are, “I’ll see you in the funny papers,” “You sound like a broken record,” or “Carbon copy.”

Today we may have Dollar Stores, but in my youth we had Five and Dimes where we could purchase Mickey Mouse wristwatches, hula hoops, candy cigarettes, skate keys, little wax bottles of colored sugar water, those lips made of red wax, Bit of Honey candy, fireballs, and see an organ grinder’s monkey. Outside the variety store there would be a dime-store pony for children to enjoy riding on and every kid had a chance to be Roy Rogers or Dale Evans, even though the ride only lasted 60 seconds.

Our style and attire? Gone are the ways of beehives. No more pedal pushers, poodle skirts, or saddle shoes. Phrases? “Knee-high to a grasshopper,” “Fiddlesticks,” “Cooties,” “Going like 60,” “It don’t take any wooden nickels,” “Heaven to Murgatroyd,” “Oh, my stars and garters!” and the phrase “Away we go!” taken from Jackie Gleason’s comedy television show, “The Honeymooners”.

Dances had names: the jerk, the smooth jerk, the frog, the ‘gator, the twist, the peppermint twist, the hully gully, the watusi, the fly, the pony, the stroll, the Freddie, not to forget doing the hand jive at sock hops.

And romance? Hubba-hubba! We’d go necking and smooching and spooning and cooing at some passion pit, lovers’ lane, or rest area where we might end up with a hickey, passion mark, or suck bump. Gee Willikers! Jumpin’ Jehoshaphat! Heavens to Betsy! People that got on your nerves were knuckleheads, nincompoops, or pills.

There is plenty more nostalgia where these came from. If you would like to send a few of your own, you can reach me at lee@leestjohnauthor.com. I’d love to hear from you.

It’s five o’clock somewhere and time to go. Saying goodbye has changed since newer phrases like “I’ll be back” or “Hasta la vista, baby” superseded the one I still say on occasion, “See ‘ya later, alligator.” I’m off to drink a Hop, Dang, Diggity.