Changing places, spaces, and faces
Sherri Jefferson is an advocate, author, and an attorney. Transforming the lives of children is her passion. Transferring knowledge is her profession.

Changing places, spaces, and faces

Sherri Jefferson is an advocate, author, and an attorney. Transforming the lives of children is her passion. Transferring knowledge is her profession.

If you drive down Forrest/92 you may see a stray tan colored mixed-breed Labrador.
If you drive up 54 toward McCurry Park, you may see a stray black and white cat.
If you drive into the plaza along 54 in Peachtree City, you may see a grey cat nested by the retail chain.
Do you remember when dogs were deemed “man’s best friend?”
Do you recall when we thought that “Morris the Cat” had nine lives?
Do you remember the smile on the faces of children who listened to stories about Dr. Seuss?
These thoughts and images created a love for pets. Well, all of that has changed.
As many families experience different kinds of changes, which includes displacement, rental, foreclosure, and loss of employment, our pets experience changes, too.
As Fayette County and the Southern Crescent continues to experience growth, many are feeling the growing pains.
Since earlier this year, Fayette County residents have implored the Commissioners to consider an ordinance, which would improve the operations of the animal shelter. No one is advocating for a new building or construction. Simply put, the citizens want to make sure that the animals are treated with dignity and that their lives are worth saving, too.
To this end, if for some reason a Commissioner is accused of not following protocol in the presentment of an ordinance, then remedy that matter and move forward. However, any alleged misstep should not preclude the reconsideration of an ordinance in furtherance of meeting the needs and concerns of the community-at-large. Never punish the community to prove a point to a colleague!
At a recent meeting, the commissioners declined to reconsider their policies and procedures regarding the ordinance. The current policies and procedures have created an environment that is conducive to euthanasia – the killing of animals.
Why must citizens implore their local elected officials to enact policies to aid their community?
Why must citizens implore their local elected officials to perform duties to uphold their oath of office?
Why must citizens seek an understanding of their commissioners’ thoughts regarding abandoning an ordinance in favor of avoiding euthanasia of pets in the county?
Why are the commissioners reluctant to enact legislation that would protect animals from being unnecessarily euthanized?
What will it take to bring the commissioners together to reconsider an ordinance that meets the needs and concerns of their constituency?
Never in the history of this county has the pleas of its citizens – cat and dog owners and lovers – been subject to disapproval from its governing boards. As Fayette County experiences changing places, spaces and faces, the commitment of local government to its citizens is changing, too.
The life of a pet is #ALifeWorthSaving.